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Blog · News

Infrastructure: It’s not all it’s cracked up to be. The perils of public private partnerships. Moral hazard in the energy arena. Wetlands are infrastructure, and they are free! Fortress EPA. Snakes on the beach!

Tuesday, August 15, 2017

The law locks up the man or woman who steals the goose from off the common. But lets the greater felon loose, who steals the common from the goose. Anonymous Folks, Another week, another missed news summary.  I have no excuse.  So, I’ll try to make this one the best yet, with a laser-like focus on one big issue – infrastructure.  The word is so solid and reassuring I’ll say it again.  Infrastructure. …

Blog · News

Shorter emails. Brilliant corvids. Not as brilliant county councils. I-526 “death rattle?” Ancient resorts. Modern heroism.

Monday, July 31, 2017

Folks, I’ve gotten a lot of comments about the past three email news summaries and took a week off to think about them.  (Actually, I was just too disorganized to get last week’s out. Sorry!)  A few significant people tactfully suggested that I cut the length down.  I agree, with the caveat that I will have to leave a few items out (important topics like testosterone research…).  With brevity in mind, I’ll get directly to…

Blog · News

The Price of Clean Air

Monday, July 24, 2017

I’m passionate about clean air. Before joining the Coastal Conservation League, I worked for the state’s Bureau of Air Quality at DHEC. There, I did air quality modeling to help inform state policy on keeping the air healthy for everyone. Clean air is important; unhealthy air can cause or contribute to respiratory diseases like asthma, emphysema and bronchitis, and it’s even been linked to heart-disease. Plus, dirty air can wreck the beautiful scenic vistas…

Blog · News

The abundance of life! Threats thereto. Protecting marine ecosystems. Preventing flooding. What YOU can do!

Wednesday, July 19, 2017

The beauty and genius of a work of art may be reconceived, though its first material expression be destroyed; a vanished harmony may yet again inspire the composer; but when the last individual of a race of living beings breathes no more, another heaven and another earth must pass before such a one can be again. William Beebe, The Bird, 1906 Folks, One of the benefits of spending a week in…

Blog · News

Losing Steve Gates. Offshore threats. Onshore threats. Cities without residents. Testosterone overload. Hilton Head steps up for the ocean. Advocates for Crab Bank.

Tuesday, July 11, 2017

Folks, Last week the Lowcountry lost one of its greatest citizens and guardians.  Steve Gates died Friday at his home on Wadmalaw Island.  In a comparatively brief time in our community, he left an unparalleled legacy of generosity and service.  I’m proud to say that Steve was a friend, but even more grateful that he decided to spend a good portion of his life in Charleston and the Lowcountry. When Steve arrived nearly two decades ago,…

Blog · News

Westvaco’s last harvest. The nuclear option. Gracious criticism. Accelerating sea level rise. Improving growth on Lady’s Island. Transportation and energy. I-73 “bunk.” Wetlands and states. Protecting communities from flooding.

Wednesday, July 5, 2017

Folks, What a dramatic weekend it was – beautiful shifting clouds, stultifying heat and humidity interrupted unexpectedly by micro-bursts of cool air from threatening, but unrealized, thunderstorms.  Although I occasionally envy our friends who annually migrate north, (human and otherwise), Lowcountry summers are incomparable and not to be missed. Summers and winters on the coast will forever be better because of the efforts of Ken Seeger. As this article from the Post and Courier reports, Ken just retired…

Blog · In The News

Courtesy lessons from France. The demise of coal. The rise of solar. To nuke or not? That is the question. A tax we can live with. A highway we can’t. Only connect. Historical cats.

Monday, June 26, 2017

Folks, It may be the lingering serenity of a great trip to France, but there seems to have been an abundance of good, or at least cautiously encouraging, news over the past two weeks.  First, some impressions of our delightful, but all too limited, French experience. France is not a small country.  It’s about the size of Texas.  But it doesn’t seem to suffer from the American affliction of bigness.  The roads are small, except for…

Blog · In The News

I was in Paris (for 3 hours), so I’m writing about Paris. Great Scott! Please help the environment! The messy business of climate change. Hope for John’s Island mobility. Crab Bank on life support. Ten rivers that pollute the ocean. Eat for GrowFood!

Thursday, June 15, 2017

Folks, I received a lot of compliments on last week’s email condemning America’s withdrawal from the Paris climate accord.  But my comments also spawned more complaints than usual.  I’ll boil them down to three points:  1) I should have reported that, unlike Syria, Nicaragua refused to sign the accord because it failed to include binding emission reduction targets. (Actually, I don’t know why Syria didn’t sign.  It could be that the country has its unclean…

Blog · News

Trump the transformer. Political pandering. Republicans, conservatives and… something else. Big sugar’s sweet tooth. Cities, and states, and local food, to the rescue. The meaning of Trump.

Wednesday, June 7, 2017

Paree will still be laughing after every one of us disappears. But never once forget, her laughter is the laughter that hides the tears. And until you’ve lived a lot, and loved lot, and lost a lot, You don’t know Paree, you don’t know Paree. -Cole Porter Folks, The news this week was all about Paris.  Sadly, however, the world’s attention was not focused on the shimmering city of light, (the epithet refers to Paris’ intellectual leadership during the Enlightenment),…

Blog · News

Not putting all our eggs in one basket. Esther Williams’ fireflies. Solar energy for conservatives. And climate change. Google “underground rivers.” The planning ruse. Show me the money. The bomb plant.

Tuesday, May 30, 2017

Folks, There was good news and bad news for nature (and humans) this week, and a few open-ended items. First, the open-ended. One of our board members emailed me two photographs of eggs washed up on the beach at Sullivan’s Island.  He wondered what bird they belonged to and where they came from.  Incisive analysis led me to conclude that they were pelican eggs (because they were three inches long and no other nesting seabird produces…

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